Tag Archives: umbrella policy

liable for internet slander

Could you be Guilty of Internet Slander? How to Cover your Assets with a Personal Umbrella

It’s very common  to take to the Internet when you have a negative experience with a business.

But could you be held liable for what you post online?

When one Dallas couple took to social media to fight a business grievance, it ended up costing them 1.08 million in damages.

It all started more than two years ago over a $125 disagreement between the couple and their wedding photographer. According to the lawsuit filed by the photographer, the couple used their social media platforms and the media as a “smear campaign,” to “destroy” her business.

The charges were defamation, disparagement, and civil conspiracy, and on August 2nd, “A Dallas County jury found… that social media posts made by Neely and Andrew Moldovan against photographer Andrea Polito amounted to defamation.”

Yikes.

It’s enough to give us pause about our own online activity, like Yelp reviews and Facebook posts.

A recent analysis on Yelp reviews found that out of the million studied, “12.8 percent were 1-star reviews.” The analysis also revealed that customers “tend to leave reviews based on their own personal feelings about their experience, rather than through an objective analysis.” This could be interpreted to mean that when reviews are based on emotions and subjective experiences rather than hard facts, they’re likely to have inaccuracies.

But can we be held liable for a negative social media post?

It’s very possible.

According to a Slate.com article, “Whether a person makes a defamatory statement on a blog, in a newspaper, or on Twitter or Facebook, he or she can be held legally liable for it.”  Furthermore, even “an email sent to a single person can be libelous.”

There is a distinction between slandering a public or private figure. In regards to public figures, “malice” must be proven, but, “In order to be liable for libel against a private figure, a person must have simply been negligent, which means not acting with a reasonable level of care in making the statement in question.”

Even if our own online behavior is squeaky clean and we’re just posting family photos and funny cat videos, we could be held liable for our kid’s online behavior, too.

Your home insurance can include personal injury, and while it’s not standard on most policies, it can be added on and it includes liability. Another option is to have an umbrella policy for this type of liability protection as it covers everything on the under line.

If you have questions about your current policies or you’d like to learn more about adding an umbrella policy to your existing coverage, please contact Cappuccino Insurance.

Why Teen Drivers make Umbrella Policies a Necessity

Car Insurance

The following story was related to us from one of our partners… 

“Mark’s summer internship in the city was a dream come true for a 17-year-old — especially because he got to drive there every day in his very own car.

TAKING THE WHEEL
His parents made sure he bought the car with his own money and also paid for the insurance, so this job definitely helped. Mark carried state minimums since that was all he could afford.

TEEN DRIVERS ARE INEXPERIENCED
While parallel parking early one morning, Mark accidentally hit the gas instead of the brake pedal while in reverse. Just then, Erica, age 32, stepped off the curb to cross the street between the parked cars and became pinned between them. The accident led to the amputation of Erica’s legs.

She was flown to a nearby hospital to receive treatment and after her extensive inpatient care, she required a special amputee rehabilitation team to aid in her recovery process. Her post-acute treatment included physical rehabilitation, expert fitting and custom-manufacture of a prostheses to help her regain function and mobility and psychological services.

HOW A PERSONAL UMBRELLA HELPED
Mark’s minimum coverage for Erica’s medical bills was quickly exhausted since he was underinsured for this type of accident.

Since Erica had a $2 MM standalone personal umbrella policy with $1 MM excess UM/UIM, it kicked in after the underinsured motorist on her auto was exhausted to take care of her outstanding medical bills.”

Claim: $1.5 MM

An umbrella policy is a stand-alone policy that allows you to both protect your assets and protect yourself from the underinsured.

Even if your teen is already insured under your policy, you may want additional protection.

Those who don’t have teens are still in need of a policy that protects them from underinsured motorists. You can’t rely on others to have the proper insurance.

New teen drivers are hitting the road this summer. Contact us today to find out how our standalone personal umbrella policy with limits up to $10 MM can help protect your insured.